swine flu-sd-health-info
  Swine Flu >>
   
 
 

Message for Parents

Guidelines for Schools

• Letter to Schools, with Fact Sheet

• Swine Flu Frequently asked questions HTML or PDF

Parents & Caregivers

• Caring For The Sick at Home

• When Should Child Go to ER?

• H1N1 Flu & You FAQs

• Childcare Provider

   
 

Flu.gov Webcast to Discuss H1N1 Preparedness for Pregnant Women and New Mothers

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services will host a Webcast Thursday, August 27 to discuss how pregnant women and new mothers can prepare for preventing contraction of the H1NI flu. Participants will include experts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health, as well as other medical professionals. The Webcast will be live on www.flu.gov at 1p.m. (EDT). To join the discussion, submit discussion questions or comments to hhsstudio@hhs.gov.

See more details about the Webcast [PDF | 1.9 MB]

   
 

...April 27, 2009- In this video, Dr. Joe Bresee with the CDC Influenza Division describes swine flu - its signs and symptoms, how it's transmitted, medicines to treat it, steps people can take to protect themselves.

   
 

TRACKING THE H1N1 VIRUS

   
 

> INDIVIDUALS ARE ENCORAGED TO TAKE THE FOLLOWING STEPS TO STOP THE SPREAD OF INFLUENZA AND OTHER ILLNESSES

• Stay home when you are sick to avoid spreading illness to friends and co-workers or students.
• Cough or sneeze into your elbow or a tissue and properly dispose of used tissues.
• Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer to get rid of most germs and avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
• Stay healthy by eating a balanced diet, drinking plenty of water and getting adequate rest and exercise.

   
 

hand washing

Importance of Hand Washing

......Sometimes the simplest things are the best. Take hand washing. Done properly and often, it’s a good habit and a great way to help protect yourself and those around you from colds and flu.
......According to the Center for Disease Control, hand washing is the single most important act people can do to prevent getting sick and making others sick.
......It is estimated that 5,000 people die each year from food borne illness. In addition, 78 million become ill and between 79,000 and 96,000 die from hospital infections each year. A direct link to many of these deaths is poor hand washing. Continued

   
  FLU SEASON IS HERE
  GRIPE > EN ESPAÑOL
  Pandemic Influenza
  Questions About Flu Shots?
  Kids Are In Danger With Cough and Cold Medications
 

Children and flu vaccine

  Over the Counter Cold Medicines
  FLU OTC Cold Medicine recommendations from The American Academy of Pediatrics
  RESPIRATORY INFECTIONS
  Asthma
  Asthma Management
  Manage Your Asthma and Score
  COPD Chronic Bronquitis
  Pneumonia
  Sinusitis
  Tuberculosis
  More information related
  ..Immunizations
  How to Lower the Medications Cost
  Medication to Quit Smoking
  All Adviced to carry health info
  Seeking Health Statistics?
  Health Insurance
  If you are a health care provider who bills for services, you probably need an NPI. Do you have your NPI?
  Fraud Scam to Medicare
  Prescriptions and insurance plans
  About the Universal Health Insurance Coverage in California
  County of San DiegoHealth and Human Services, HHS
  Aging & Independence Services
  Alcohol and Drug Services
  County of San Diego Emergency
  Housing Commission
  Mental Health Services
  Tobacco Control
  Vector Control Program
   
 

 

   
 

SAN DIEGO'S SWINE FLU UP-DATE

......The Flu (influenza) is a contagious disease caused by respiratory viruses that mutate from year to year. In recent years, outbreaks of influenza have reached high levels of expansion. When people have no immunity to new viruses, they cannot fight it, get sick, and begin to spread the flu. When the flu spread rapidly an epidemic occurs covering long distances, and infecting millions of people causing a large number of pneumonia cases and deaths.

county seal

Two More H1N1 Flu-related Deaths Reported

By COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

July 13, 2009-The County of San Diego Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) is confirming two more deaths associated with the pandemic H1N1 Influenza virus.
The deaths are:
* A 57-year-old male died July 2 with underlying medical conditions.
* A 64-year-old male died July 9 with underlying medical conditions.
Including these two individuals, there have been seven H1N1-related deaths in San Diego County. There are 613 confirmed cases of H1N1 Influenza in the county including the San Diego County's jails. Law enforcement officials say 56 inmates and 11 employees are showing symptoms of the swine flu. The 45 men are being quarantined at Donovan State Prison, and 11 women are quarantined at Las Colinas. The symptomatic employees have been sent home. More than 1,000 inmates have been exposed, and for now visiting is on hold at all county jails.
The public is encouraged to stay home from work or school if they have influenza-like illness or symptoms similar to the seasonal flu which includefever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue.
If an individual with underlying medical conditions is experiencing influenza-like illness or symptoms, they should contact their primary care physician in a timely manner.

Grants Will Support Work to Protect Public Health,
Prepare for Novel H1N1and Seasonal Flu

By UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

..... July 10, 2009-States Eligible to Receive $350 Million for H1N1, Seasonal Flu Preparedness Efforts. One day after hosting a summit on the 2009 novel H1N1 flu with representatives from state, tribal, territorial and local governments from across the country, HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius today announced the availability of $350 million in grants to help states and territories prepare for the 2009 novel H1N1 flu virus and the fall flu season. The grants were funded by the recent supplemental appropriations bill that was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Barack Obama on June 24, 2009.
....."With flu season around the corner, we must remain vigilant and do all we can to prepare our nation and protect public health," said Secretary Sebelius. "These grants will give states valuable resources to step up their flu preparedness efforts."
.....A total of $260 million in Public Health Emergency Response Grants and $90 million in Hospital Preparedness grants will be distributed nationwide.
.....Public Health Emergency Response grants help state public health departments perform a variety of functions, including preparing for potential vaccination campaigns, implementing strategies to reduce people's exposure to the 2009 novel H1N1 flu and improving influenza
surveillance and investigations.
.....Hospital Preparedness grants enhance the ability of hospitals and health care systems to prepare for and respond to public health emergencies. Local outbreaks of the novel H1N1 virus have produced a surge of patients at hospitals, and these grants will help ensure hospitals are
ready for future outbreaks that may impact their community.
.....In addition to the grants released today, the Obama Administration has taken a series of steps to help prepare and protect the American people from the novel H1N1 flu. In May of this year, HHS distributed 11 million treatment courses of antivirals to states, territories and tribes to fight the H1N1 influenza outbreak. Also in May, HHS invested more than $1 billion to produce bulk supplies of key vaccine ingredients as part of the process to develop and test a potential H1N1 vaccine.
.....The Administration has upgraded and expanded www.flu.gov, which includes guidance that community leaders and the American people need to prepare for, prevent, and respond to the H1N1 flu virus.

county seal

County of San Diego's Fifth H1N1 Flu-Related Death

By COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

July 9, 2009- A 36 year-old male is the fifth death associated with the Novel H1N1 Influenza virus in San Diego County, the Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) confirmed today. The individual has underlying health issues and died on Saturday, July 4th.
.....“We want to send our thoughts and sympathies to the family of this individual,” said San Diego County Public Health Officer Wilma Wooten, M.D., M.P.H. “We again remind all San Diego County residents to continue to be vigilant about using common-sense steps to prevent the spread of this flu by covering their coughs and sneezes, washing their hands frequently and properly and, most importantly, staying home if they are sick.
.....“The pandemic H1N1 Influenza virus is widespread throughout our community. It’s not uncommon that the virus will be seen in congregate situations like camps, long-term care facilities or other places where large numbers of people reside or gather.”
.....The public is encouraged to stay home if they have influenza-like illness or symptoms similar to the seasonal flu which includefever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue.
“If an individual with underlying medical conditions is experiencing influenza-like illness or symptoms, they should contact their primary care physician in a timely manner,” added Wooten.
For additional information on pandemic H1N1 influenza visit www.sdcounty.ca.gov or www.cdc.gov or call 2-1-1 San Diego.

county seal

Fourth Death Associated with H1N1 Influenza Confirmed
by County Health and Human Services Agency
>>Total Number of Cases in San Diego County is 531<<

July 7, 2009- A 50 year-old female is the fourth death associated with the Novel H1N1 Influenza virus in San Diego County, the Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) confirmed today.
“This is an unfortunate incident. Our thoughts are with the friends and family of this individual,” said Wooten.
.....“It’s particularly important for individuals with underlying medical conditions to see their primary care physician in a timely manner if they are experiencing influenza-like illness or symptoms,” added Wooten. The public is also encouraged to stay home from work or school if they have influenza-like illness or symptoms similar to the seasonal flu which include fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, headache, chills and fatigue.
........Residents are also encouraged to take the following precautions:
...........• Covering mouth when coughing, sneezing or blowing nose
...........• Washing hands frequently and properly

.....“These routine precautions can go a long way in protecting your health and the health of those around you,” explained Wooten.
.....As of July 7, the California Department of Health reports 1,658 cases of H1N1 Influenza, including 23 deaths. San Diego County has 531 confirmed H1N1 cases and four deaths as of July 7, 2009. For additional information on H1N1 influenza visit www.sdcounty.ca.gov or www.cdc.gov or call 2-1-1 San Diego.San Diego County Public Health Officer. “Our thoughts are with the friends and families of these individuals.”

county seal

Two More Local H1N1 Flu-related Deaths
>>Total Number of Cases in San Diego County is 392 <<

By COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

June 29, 2009-The San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) has confirmed two additional deaths associated with the Novel H1N1 Influenza virus. The deceased are a 49-year-old female and a 75-year-old male.
“These two deaths are a reminder that everyone needs to be aware that H1N1 Influenza continues to infect people in our community,” said Dr. Wilma Wooten, M.D., M.P.H., San Diego County Public Health Officer. “Our thoughts are with the friends and families of these individuals.”
“We encourage residents of San Diego County to take the necessary precautions as they would during a regular flu season. These precautions include covering your mouth when coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose, and washing hands frequently and properly,” Wooten added. “These routine precautions can go a long way in protecting your health and the health of those around you.”
As of June 25, the California Department of Health reports 1,294 cases of H1N1 Influenza and 19 H1N1 related deaths in California. San Diego County has 392 confirmed H1N1 cases and three deaths as of June 29.For additional information on H1N1 influenza visit: County of San Diego: Swine Flu or www.sdcounty.ca.gov or www.cdc.gov .>> Video: HHS News Conference (1:30 p.m.)

county seal

County of San Diego's First H1N1 Flu Death

By COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

June 16, 2009- The San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) confirmed during a press conference yesterday evening the first local death associated with the Novel H1N1 Influenza virus. The victim was a 20-year-old female.
“This is a tragic reminder that the H1N1 virus is still very much active in our community,” said Wilma Wooten, M.D., M.P.H., San Diego County Public Health Officer. “Our sympathies are with her family and friends.
“Residents of San Diego County still need to be vigilant about H1N1 and take the necessary precautions of covering their mouth when they cough, sneeze or blow their nose, and wash their hands frequently,” Wooten added. “We are still monitoring this virus and working with local, state and national health officials, but it will be several months before a vaccine is developed for H1N1.”
The woman’s death was the seventh H1N1 related death in California. There have been two deaths in Alameda County and one each in Contra Costa, Los Angeles, Orange and San Bernardino counties.
There have been 275 confirmed H1N1 cases and 25 hospitalizations in San Diego County.For additional information on H1N1 influenza visit www.sdcounty.ca.gov or www.cdc.gov or call 2-1-1 San Diego.

H1N1 Influenza Update

By WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION

May 11, 2009 --30 countries have officially reported 4694 cases of influenza A(H1N1) infection.
The United States has reported 2532 laboratory confirmed human cases, including three deaths. Canada has reported 284 laboratory confirmed human cases, including one death. Mexico has reported 1626 laboratory confirmed human cases of infection, including 48 deaths. Costa Rica has reported eight laboratory confirmed human cases, including one death. Continued

SWINE FLU MAY 11 09 UPDATE

county seal

19 New H1N1 Flu Cases Confirmed
>>Total Number of Cases in San Diego County is 51 <<

By COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

May 8, 2009-The San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) reports that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed 19 new cases of human infection with H1N1 Influenza in San Diego County residents, bringing the total number of cases to 51. All of those cases were moved from the probable list to the confirmed list.
There will be no updates distributed over the weekend. For additional information on H1N1 influenza visit www.sdcounty.ca.gov or www.cdc.gov or call 2-1-1 San Diego.

Three New Confirmed Cases of H1N1 Influenza
>>Total Number of Cases in San Diego County is 32<<

By COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

May 7, 2009 --The San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) reports that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed three new cases of human infection with H1N1 Influenza in San Diego County residents, bringing the total number of cases to 32.
The three new cases are:
• An 8-year-old male
• A 25-year-old female
• An 18-year-old male
“We continue to stress the things the public can do to protect themselves: if you are sick, do not go to work, school or travel. Cover your mouth when coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose, and wash your hands frequently,” said Wilma Wooten, M.D., M. P.H., County Public Health Officer.
For additional information on swine influenza visit www.sdcounty.ca.gov or www.cdc.gov or call 2-1-1 San Diego.

Two New Confirmed Cases of H1N1 Influenza
>>Total Number of Cases in San Diego County is 29<<

By COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

May 6, 2009 --The San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) reports that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed two new cases of human infection with H1N1 Influenza in San Diego County residents, bringing the total number of cases to 29.
The two new cases are both military cases. One is a 22-year-old male and no information is available on the second individual.
“If you are sick, do not go to work, school or travel. Cover your mouth when coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose, and wash your hands frequently,” said Wilma Wooten, M.D.,
M. P.H., County Public Health Officer.
For additional information on swine influenza visit www.sdcounty.ca.gov or www.cdc.gov or call 2-1-1 San Diego.

county sealClosed County Schools Set to Reopen; Area Residents Urged to Relieve Pressure on Local Emergency Departments
>>San Diego County Reports Three New Confirmed H1N1 Cases.Total Stands at 27<<

By COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

May 5, 09— The San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) is working with local school district officials to reopen three local high schools where students were dismissed, based on new recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The schools are scheduled to reopen Wednesday.
“We received new guidelines on school closures this morning from the CDC and we are working closely with the education officials from the two school districts to open the schools to students once again,” said Wilma Wooten, M.D., M.P.H., and County Public Health Officer. “The new guidelines call for schools to remain open - with an emphasis on having students, teachers or staff who exhibit influenza-like illness stay home and not go to school or out into the community for at least seven days.”
The new guidelines call for student dismissals only when there is a large number of faculty or students absent and that interferes with a school’s ability to function, according to the CDC.
The schools where students were dismissed include San Diego School of Creative and Performing Arts and Kearny High School in the San Diego Unified School District and Mission Hills High School in the San Marcos Unified School District.
Area parents are also asked to refrain from bringing children to area emergency departments to be tested for H1N1 Influenza. “Our local emergency departments are being severely impacted with people bringing in children to be tested. Only those individuals that develop complications from Influenza-like illness should be evaluated by their primary care providers,” said Wooten.
The CDC has confirmed three new cases of human infection with H1N1 Influenza in San Diego County residents, bringing the total number of cases to 27. The new cases are a 1-year-old male and two military cases: a 33-year-old male and a 37-year-old male.

American Lung Association Offers Tips to Protect Public Health and Minimize H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) Transmission

By THE AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATION

AMERICAN LUNG ASSOCIATIONWashington, D.C. -May 5, 2009— As the confirmed number of H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) cases grows in the United States, public concern understandably grows. The American Lung Association wishes to ease public concern by offering proven advice on how to prevent the spread of contagious respiratory illnesses ranging from the common cold to H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu).
“The American Lung Association has been helping America respond to lung disease for more than 100 years now,” said Stephen J. Nolan American Lung Association National Board Chair.
“Good hygiene is the best and first line of defense against any type of cold or flu,” said Norman H. Edelman, MD, American Lung Association Chief Medical Officer. “This includes frequent hand washing and covering your mouth when coughing or sneezing.”
The American Lung Association advises that hand washing is most effective with liquid soap. Hands should be rubbed vigorously under running water of any temperature for at least 20 seconds. Consider singing the “Happy Birthday” song twice in your head to ensure hands are scrubbed long enough. Hands should be dried thoroughly before coming in contact with anything such as door knobs and even the faucet.
Carrying an alcohol based hand sanitizer is a useful alternative to hand washing when soap and water are not available.
“Take care to avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth,” advised Dr. Edelman. “This is one way in which germs are easily spread. Avoiding close contact with sick people is another key line of defense.”
It is important to be aware of flu symptoms so that precautionary measures can be taken if illness occurs. H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) presents symptoms similar to seasonal flu such as fever, lethargy, lack of appetite, coughing, body aches and pains and has not been reported to be any more severe than the common flu. Anyone who experiences mild symptoms is advised to stay at home to best prevent the spread of illness to others. However, those with more severe symptoms are urged to contact their health care provider.
While H1N1 Flu (Swine Flu) is serious and preventive measures should be a top priority. Additional information on influenza can be found on the American Lung Association’s website at: www.lungusa.org.

county sealNine New Confirmed Cases of H1N1 Influenza
>>One Hospitalized; Total Number of Cases in San Diego County is 24<<

By COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

May 4, 09- The San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) reports that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed nine new cases of human infection with H1N1 Influenza in San Diego County residents, bringing the total number of cases to 24.
One of the new cases, an 18-year-old female, was hospitalized, but has since recovered. Two of them have a travel history to Mexico.
The probable cases that led to the closures of San Diego School of Creative and Performing Arts in Paradise Hills, Kearny High School in Kearny Mesa and Mission Hills High School in San Marcos have all now been confirmed as H1N1 Influenza cases by the CDC.
New cases confirmed today:
• A 9-year-old female
• A 12-year-old female
• A 15-year-old female
• A 15-year-old male
• An 18-year-old female
• A 20-year-old female
• A 42-year-old male
• A 51-year-old male
• A 53-year-old female
For additional information on swine influenza visit www.sdcounty.ca.gov or www.cdc.gov

SAN DIEGO DISTRIC ATTORNEYDA, City Attorney Warn of Price Gouging
During Swine Flu State of Emergency

By COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO CITY ATTORNEY OFFICE

May 4, 09- San Diego County District Attorney Bonnie M. Dumanis and San Diego City Attorney Jan Goldsmith today issued a price gouging warning to retailers, along with consumer advice and assistance to residents during the swine flu state of emergency.
“While health officials continue to stress there is no need for panic, retailers who seek to take advantage of the situation by increasing prices for certain products need to know they may be breaking the law,” said DA Dumanis. “Consumers should also know their rights and legal protections in place as they shop for items such as masks and hand sanitizer.”
After the Governor declares a state of emergency, it is illegal for businesses to increase prices of essential goods and services by more than ten percent unless they can prove it was due to an increase in their supplier’s price. The prohibition on price gouging after a state of emergency applies to consumer food and services, supplies and medical supplies.
In one case of alleged price gouging in Imperial County, a pharmacy was reported to be charging $89 for a $7 box of surgical masks. Other cases of online price gouging by Internet retailers have also been reported. The Centers for Disease Control is not recommending the use of masks, unless you are caring for a sick person.
“Price gouging during a State of Emergency is a violation of the law and will not be tolerated,” said City Attorney Jan Goldsmith. “Our office will carefully evaluate and won’t hesitate to prosecute such cases that may arise in the city of San Diego.”
Consumers can report price gouging by calling the District Attorney’s Consumer Hotline at 619-531-3507.

county sealFour New Confirmed Cases of H1N1 Influenza
>>Total Number of Cases in San Diego County is 15 <<

By COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

MAY 3 , 2009- The San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) reports that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed four new cases of human infection with H1N1 Influenza in San Diego County residents.
The four new cases are a 3-year-old female, a 17-year-old male, a 35-year-old female and a 33-year-old male. The 35-year-old female and 33-year-old male are cases previously confirmed by the military. This brings the total number of confirmed cases in San Diego County to 15.
Cases confirmed so far:
• A 17-year-old male (5/3/09)
• A 3-year-old female (5/3/09)
• A 35-year-old female (5/3/09)
• A 33-year-old male (5/3/09)
• A 48-year-old male (5/1/09)
• A 22-year-old female and her 3-year-old daughter (5/1/09)
• A 23-year-old male (4/29/09)
• A 20-year-old male (4/27/09)
• A 7-year-old male (4/24/09), his 38-year-old father and 3-year-old brother (4/29/09)
• A 54-year-old male and his 16-year-old daughter (4/23/09)
• A 10-year-old male (4/21/09)
The San Diego School of Creative and Performing Arts in Paradise Hills, Kearny High School in Kearny Mesa and Mission Hills High School in San Marcos remain closed as a precaution until further notice.
For additional information on swine influenza visit www.sdcounty.ca.gov or www.cdc.gov

county sealOfficials Close Mission Hills High School as a Precaution
Student has Probable H1N1 Influenza Infection

By COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

MAY 1st. , 2009- The San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency’s (HHSA) Public Health Services and the San Marcos Unified School District are closing Mission Hills High School as a precaution after a student was diagnosed as a new probable H1N1 Influenza case.
“HHSA Public Health Services works closely with local school officials in making a decision about closing a school in accordance with guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,” said Wilma Wooten, M.D., M.P.H., San Diego County Public Health Officer. “The closure of the school is a preventative measure to help prevent possible further infections.”
“We know closing the school is a burden for the families affected, but it’s a necessary step to ensure the continued good health of our students and faculty,” said San Marcos Unified School District Superintendent Dr. Kevin Holt.
“The best preventive measures an individual can take are the basic steps of staying home if you are sick; cover your mouth when coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose; and wash your hands frequently,” said Wooten.
For additional information on H1N1 Influenza visit www.sdcounty.ca.gov or www.cdc.gov or call 2-1-1 San Diego.

Three New Local Cases of H1N1 Flu Virus Confirmed

By COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

MAY 1st. , 2009- Three new cases of H1N1 flu virus infection in San Diego County residents have been confirmed, according to the County Health & Human Services Agency (HHSA) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC).
The three new cases are a 22-year-old female and her 3-year-old daughter, and a 48-year-old male.This brings the total number of confirmed cases in San Diego County to 11. The 48-year-old male is currently in Nebraska. None of the new cases required hospitalization.
Public Health and San Diego Unified School District officials have also closed the San Diego School of Creative and Performing Arts in Paradise Hills and Kearny High School in Kearny Mesa as a precaution.
Both schools have probable cases and are being closed in accordance with CDC guidelines.
Cases confirmed so far:
• A 48-year-old male (5/1/09)
• A 22-year-old female and her 3-year-old daughter (5/1/09)
• A 23-year-old male (4/29/09)
• A 20-year-old male (4/27/09)
• A 7-year-old male (4/24/09), his 38-year-old father and 3-year-old brother (4/29/09)
• A 54-year-old male and his 16-year-old daughter (4/23/09)
• A 10-year-old male (4/21/09)
“Once again, we can’t stress enough the basic steps the public can take to help contain the spread of this virus,” said Wilma Wooten, M.D., M.P.H., San Diego County Public Health Officer.
“If you are sick, do not go to work, school or travel. Cover your mouth when coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose, and wash your hands frequently,” Wooten concluded.

Are you prepared for a swine flu outbreak?

BY THE AMERICAN RED CROSS

May 1st., 2009- The We’ve gotten a lot of questions from around the country about the swine flu (H1N1).
We’re all concerned about the news headlines. But the best way to protect yourself and your family’s health isn’t to panic­it’s to get prepared.
Click on the link below for important tips to keep your family healthy, watch our video and find out how to put together an emergency preparedness kit for your home:
http://www.redcross.org/pandemicflu
Prepping an emergency preparedness kit for your home is important all year long, but it’s particularly important in outbreak situations like the swine flu.
Luckily, there’s a lot you can do right now to prepare in case the worst happens in your area.
If the illness becomes widespread, you should limit your exposure to it by staying close to home. That means stocking up on food, water, and other necessary supplies.
Access our preparedness resources here:
http://www.redcross.org/pandemicflu
We’ll continue to provide updated information as the swine flu situation develops. I hope you’ll take the preparedness recommendations to heart, to keep yourself and your family safe and healthy.

county sealNo New Confirmed Cases of Swine Flu
Total Confirmed Cases Still at Eight

By COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

April 30, 2009- The San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) reports no new confirmed cases of human infection with swine influenza A (H1N1) in San Diego County residents.
“We are aggressively working to mitigate the spread of the swine flu virus and working with our community partners to educate the public on what they can do to help contain the virus,” said Wilma Wooten, M.D., M.P.H., San Diego County Public Health Officer.
“We are in contact with local governments, area schools, college campuses, and our health care providers and hospitals to make sure they have the information they need and are prepared.”
Cases confirmed so far:
• A 10-year-old male (4/21/09)
• A 54-year-old male and his 16-year-old daughter (4/23/09)
• A 7-year-old male (4/24/09)
• A 20-year-old male (4/27/09)
• A 3-year-old male (4/29/09)
• A 38-year-old male (4/29/09)
• A 23-year-old male (4/29/09)
“Once again, we can’t stress enough the basic steps the public can take to help contain the spread of this virus,” said Wooten. “If you are sick, do not go to work, school or travel. Cover your mouth when coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose, and wash your hands frequently,” Wooten concluded.
For additional information on swine influenza visit www.sdcounty.ca.gov or www.cdc.gov or call 2-1-1 San Diego.
For updates, please follow the County of San Diego by clicking below on Twitter, the County’s Web site, Facebook and YouTube.

Sharp HealthCare is ready and equipped
to care for patients in the San Diego community.

BY SHARP HEALTHCARE

April 30, 2009- The safety and care of our patients is our top priority. Here, we connect you to the latest information on H1N1 (swine) flu. Learn how to prevent H1N1 flu and, if you're showing symptoms, when you should seek medical attention.

What to Do If You Get Sick
Contact your physician if you become ill with flu-like symptoms, including fever, body aches, runny nose, sore throat, nausea, vomiting or diarrhea. Your doctor will determine if influenza testing or treatment is needed.
If you are sick, stay home and avoid contact with others as much as you can. If you become ill and experience any of the following warning signs, seek emergency medical care.

>In children, emergency warning signs that need
urgent medical attention include:

Bluish skin color
Fast breathing or difficulty breathing
Fever with a rash
Symptoms improve; then return with fever and worse cough
Irritability
Not drinking enough fluids
Not waking up or not interacting

> In adults, emergency warning signs
that need urgent medical attention include:

Confusion
Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
Pain or pressure in chest or abdomen
Severe or persistent vomiting
Sudden dizziness

county sealThe County of San Diego and Imperial County
Declare Local health Emergencies
Declarations are Routine in Preparing for Outbreaks

By COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

April 29, 2009 -County of San Diego and Imperial County both declared local health emergencies today. The declarations are routine steps in preparations for addressing an outbreak of swine flu. There are 8 confirmed cases in San Diego County and 5 confirmed cases in Imperial County
“Declaring a public health emergency is routine in situations like this and done to assist our health professionals in doing their job of protecting our residents,” said Dianne Jacob, Chairwoman, County of San Diego Board of Supervisors, District 2. “We want residents to remain calm and know that County government is doing everything we can to mitigate the spread of the swine flu virus. Our health professionals are working around the clock.”
“It is important for Imperial County residents to know that we are aggressively addressing swine flu in Imperial County,” said Wally Leimgruber, Chairman, Imperial County Board of Supervisors. “This declaration is strictly precautionary and will allow the County to recover local costs associated with the swine influenza situation. We continue to work closely with federal and state agencies as well as our neighboring counties to ensure that all appropriate measures are being taken.”
The emergency declaration allows both counties flexibility in dealing with the swine flu virus and allows them to access state and federal funds, supplies and equipment that have been made available.
The County of San Diego Health and Human Services Agency and the Imperial County Public Health Department continue to work closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the California Department of Public Health to determine the cause of the infections and the extent of human-to-human spread of the swine flu.

county sealCounty of San Diego County Health and Human Services Agencyreports three new cases of Swine Flu
Total Cases Now Stand at 8 in San Diego County

By COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

April 29, 2009 -The San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) reports that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed three new cases of human infection with swine influenza A (H1N1) in San Diego County residents. The new cases are a 23-year-old male, a 38-year-old male and a 3-year-old male. That brings to eight the number of San Diego residents with swine flu:
• A 10-year-old male (4/21/09)
• A 54-year-old male and his 16-year-old daughter (4/23/09)
• A 7-year-old male (4/24/09)
• A 20-year-old male (4/27/09)
• A 3-year-old male (4/29/09)
• A 38-year-old male (4/29/09)
• A 23-year-old male (4/29/09)

  .....“We are closely monitoring the developments with the swine influenza virus and making sure County residents are well informed,” said Wilma Wooten, M.D., M.P.H., San Diego County Public Health Officer. “We can’t stress enough the basic steps the public can take to help contain the spread of this virus."
....“If you are sick, do not go to work, school or travel. Cover your mouth when coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose, and wash your hands frequently,” Wooten concluded.

For additional information on swine influenza visit > www.sdcounty.ca.gov or www.cdc.gov or call 2-1-1 San Diego. For updates, please follow the County of San Diego by clicking below on Twitter, the County’s Web site, Facebook and YouTube.

WHO Swine influenza update

BY MARCIA PRYCE,CMS.HHS.GOV

April 29,09- 29 April 2009 -- The situation continues to evolve rapidly. As of 18:00 GMT, 29 April 2009, nine countries have officially reported 148 cases of swine influenza A/H1N1 infection. The United States Government has reported 91 laboratory confirmed human cases, with one death. Mexico has reported 26 confirmed human cases of infection including seven deaths.
The following countries have reported laboratory confirmed cases with no deaths - Austria (1), Canada (13), Germany (3), Israel (2), New Zealand (3), Spain (4) and the United Kingdom (5).
Further information on the situation will be available on the WHO website on a regular basis.
WHO advises no restriction of regular travel or closure of borders. It is considered prudent for people who are ill to delay international travel and for people developing symptoms following international travel to seek medical attention, in line with guidance from national authorities.
There is also no risk of infection from this virus from consumption of well-cooked pork and pork products. Individuals are advised to wash hands thoroughly with soap and water on a regular basis and should seek medical attention if they develop any symptoms of influenza-like illness.
More Updates

Preventing the Flu:
Good Health Habits Can Help Stop Germs

BY MARCIA PRYCE,CMS.HHS.GOV

April 29,09- The single best way to prevent seasonal flu is to get vaccinated each year, but good health habits like covering your cough and washing your hands often can help stop the spread of germs and prevent respiratory illnesses like the flu. There also are flu antiviral drugs that can be used to treat and prevent the flu.
> 1-Avoid close contact.
Avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too.
> 2-Stay home when you are sick.
If possible, stay home from work, school, and errands when you are sick. You will help prevent others from catching your illness.
> 3-Cover your mouth and nose.
Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around you from getting sick.
> 4-Clean your hands.
Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs.
> 5-Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.
Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.
> 6- Practice other good health habits.
Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat nutritious food.
Printable Materials for Promoting Good Health Habits
Cover Your Cough
Be a Germ Stopper: Healthy Habits Keep You Well
Flu Prevention Toolkit: Real People. Real Solutions
Stopping the Spread of Germs at Home, Work & School

Flu, Answers Questions from the American People

By U.S. HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, HHS

April 29, 2009- The Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, Homeland Security
Secretary Janet Napolitano and Acting Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Rich Besser will host a Webcast to answer questions and provide information directly to the American people regarding the 2009 H1N1 flu on Thursday at 1:00 p.m. EDT. The Webcast can be viewed at .www.hhs.gov or www.cdc.gov.
....."At times like this, clear accurate information is one of the most powerful tools we have and we look forward to answering questions and speaking directly to the American people," said Secretary Sebelius. "Our administration believes in using new methods to engage the American people and ensure they can speak directly to their public officials. This Webcast is an important part of that effort."
....."It's imperative that the American people know exactly what their government is doing, and exactly what they can do themselves to mitigate the spread of this virus," said Secretary Napolitano. "Everyone has a part to play in this, and it's important that the lines of
communications are open."
Questions for the officials can be submitted by emailing .hhsstudio@hhs.gov. Additional information regarding the Webcast is included below.Registration for the Webcast is not required.
WHAT: Webcast regarding 2009 H1N1 flu virus
WHEN: Thursday, April 30, 2009 at 1:00 p.m. EDT
WHERE: Watch the Webcast live at www.hhs.gov or www.cdc.gov.
Please note, you will need Flash ( (http://www.adobe.com) ) installed on your computer in order to view the live video stream.

CDC Confirms First U.S. Swine Flu Death

BY PEGGY PECK, EXECUTIVE EDITOR, MEDPAGE

CLEVELAND, April 29 -- The first U.S. victim of swine flu is a Texas toddler, Richard Besser, M.D., acting director of the CDC said today.
"I can confirm the very sad news out of Texas that a child has died of the H1N1 virus," Dr. Besser said.
Although no additional details have been released, the website for the Texas Department of State Health Services lists two counties with swine flu -- Dallas and Guadalupe, each with three cases. The earliest known onset date was April 11 and the latest known onset date was April 24.
The World Health Organization is now reporting 112 confirmed cases of swine flu, with cases reported in Canada, New Zealand, Israel, Spain, the U.K., and Germany, as well as the U.S. and Mexico.
Also CDC and Mexican health officials are said to be focusing on a small mountain village in Mexico in the search for the source of the outbreak.

county sealNo New Swine Flu Cases Reported in San Diego County

By COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

April 28, 2009 -The County of San Diego Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) has no new cases of swine influenza to report today.
The school that was closed as a precautionary measure has been cleared to reopen.
“A little bit of good news today - the specimens from the faculty members at Christ the Cornerstone Academy were sent in for testing and came back negative,” said Wilma Wooten, M.D., M.P.H., County Public Health Officer. “The school has been notified that it can reopen at their discretion.”
To date, five cases of swine flu have been reported in San Diego County:
• A 20-year-old male (4/27/09)
• A 7-year-old male (4/24/09)
• A 54-year-old male and his 16-year-old daughter (4/23/09)
• A 10-year-old male (4/21/09)
HHSA continues to work closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the California Department of Public Health to determine the cause of the infections and the extent of human-to-human spread. If additional cases are detected, HHSA will promptly report them to the public.
San Diego County residents who are seeking more information on the swine flu can call 2-1-1 San Diego.
For updates, please follow the County of San Diego by clicking below on Twitter, the County’s Web site, Facebook and YouTube.

county sealSan Diego County Health and Human Services Agency Reports Fifth Case of Swine Flu

By COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

April 27, 2009 -The San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) reports that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed a fifth case of human infection with swine influenza A (H1N1) in a San Diego County resident. The new case is a 20-year-old male.
That brings to five the number of San Diego residents with swine flu:
· A 10-year-old male (4/21/09)
· A 54-year-old male and his 16-year-old daughter (4/23/09)
· A 7-year-old male (4/24/09)
· A 20-year-old male (4/27/09)
“We are not surprised to see this additional case of human infection with swine influenza because we have heightened our surveillance and put area healthcare providers on alert,” said Wilma Wooten, M.D., M.P.H., San Diego County Public Health Officer. “We have no further details about the case at this time as the investigation is ongoing.”
Health and school officials also announce the closure of Christ the Corner Stone Academy in Mira Mesa as a precaution. “There is some concern about potential illness among contacts, including teachers, of one of the previously confirmed cases,” said Wooten. “The closure is a precaution to make sure the virus does not spread among the school population.”
The County is also about to receive the first shipment of anti-virals from the state and national stockpiles. “The first batch of anti-virals have been released and is on its way to San Diego County,” said Wooten. “We will be receiving more in the coming days.”
San Diego County residents who are seeking more information on the swine flu can call 2-1-1 San Diego.

Swine Flu Reinforces the Importance of
Preparing for Emergencies, Says APHA

BY THE AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION

Washington, D.C., April 27, 2009 – The American Public Health Association (APHA) urges the public to use the current swine flu outbreak as an opportunity to ensure that they and their families are prepared for potential pandemics, disasters or any other health emergencies that may arise.
“Although it is far too early to know the degree to which the current swine flu outbreak warrants alarm, the number of cases and the speed with which the virus has spread around the globe serves as an opportunity to spread the message of the critical nature of preparedness,” said Georges C. Benjamin, MD, FACP, FACEP (E), executive director of the APHA.
APHA’s Get Ready campaign helps all Americans prepare themselves, their families and their communities for all disasters and hazards, including pandemic flu, infectious disease, natural disasters and other emergencies. Along with a wealth of pandemic flu resources, visitors to the site will also find fact sheets, blog entries, handouts, podcasts, Q&As and a variety of other resources to help their families get ready for any type of emergency.
Some of the preparedness tips for a potential pandemic include:
• Staying healthy and keeping others from getting sick by washing your hands frequently, avoiding close contact with people who are sick, covering your nose and mouth when you sneeze and staying home from work or school if sick;
• Creating an emergency preparedness kit with food, water, medical supplies and anything else you might need if you had to stay at home for an extended period of time; and
• Talking to your employer about their contingency plan for a potential situation where many employees are unable to work or must work from home.
“While investing in our nation’s public health infrastructure is an essential component of pandemic preparedness, it is also up to each of us to take steps as individuals and as members of a family and community to ensure we are well prepared when a public health emergency occurs,” Benjamin said.
Visit the Get Ready Web site at www.aphagetready.org to learn more about how to prepare for a pandemic or other emergency.

WHO Raises Pandemic Threat of Swine Flu

BY MICHAEL SMITH CORRESPONDENT, MED PAGE TODAY

TORONTO, April 27 -- The World Health Organization has raised its pandemic alert system to Level 4 -- sustained human-to-human transmission -- in response to the swine flu outbreak in the U.S., Mexico, and at least two other countries.
The Geneva-based WHO made the change from Level 3 -- some human-to-human transmission -- on the advice of an expert panel meeting today.
Earlier today, acting CDC director Richard Besser, M.D., said the change won't affect the U.S. response to the outbreak.
"It really doesn't matter from our perspective what you call this," he said in a press conference. "Our actions are based on what's happening in our country and our communities."
The pandemic threat level has six major levels. Phases 1 through 3 increase from strictly animal-to-animal transmission to some human-to-human transmission, sufficient to create small clusters of disease.
Level 4 requires sustained human-to-human transmission able to cause what the WHO calls "community-level outbreaks."
Levels 5 and 6 are the pandemic levels.
Phase 5 is characterized by human-to-human spread of the virus into at least two countries in a region, although most countries are not affected.
In phase 6, there are community-level outbreaks in at least one other country in a different region. This level is regarded as a signal that a global pandemic is truly under way.

HHS Declares Public Health Emergency for Swine Flu

By U.S. HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, HHS

April 26, 2009- The Department of Health and Human Services today issued a nationwide public health emergency declaration in response to recent human infections with a newly discovered swine influenza A (swine flu) virus.
The formal declaration of a Public Health Emergency (PHE) is a tool that facilitates HHS’ preparation and mobilization for disasters and emergencies.
Today’s declaration, made under section 319 of the Public Health Service Act, will help HHS prepare for prevention and mitigation activities by enabling Food and Drug Administration (FDA) emergency use authorizations of drugs, devices, or medical tests under certain circumstances.
Specifically, today’s PHE will enable the FDA to review and issue emergency use authorizations (EUAs) for the use of certain laboratory tests to help detect the newly discovered strain of influenza and for the emergency use of certain antivirals.
“HHS is taking these steps today to be proactive in responding to this new influenza virus by offering national tools in support of community-led preparedness and response efforts,” Acting HHS Secretary Charles Johnson said. “The declaration allows us the flexibility, while we learn more about the virus and its impact in the United States, to take additional steps to fully mobilize our prevention, treatment and mitigation capabilities should those actions become necessary.”
In addition to the declaration, HHS leaders are working together across operating divisions to coordinate response to the swine flu outbreak. For example, the FDA, the National Institutes of Health, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are working together to develop a vaccine precursor that could be used to develop a vaccine for this swine flu virus.
To date, there have been 20 confirmed cases of swine Influenza A (swH1N1) in California, Texas, Kansas, New York, and Ohio. No deaths in the U.S. have been reported due to the illness. Additional cases of the virus have been confirmed in Mexico and Canada.
Swine flu is a respiratory disease of pigs caused by type A influenza that regularly causes outbreaks of influenza among pigs. Swine flu viruses do not normally infect humans; however, human infections with swine flu do occur, and cases of human-to-human spread of swine flu viruses have been documented.
The public health emergency declaration is available at www.hhs.gov/ For information on swine flu, visit www.cdc.gov

county sealNo New Swine Flu Cases Reported in San Diego County

By COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

April 26, 2009 -The County of San Diego Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) has no new cases of swine influenza to report today.
“The national declaration of a Public Health Emergency now allows us to utilize federal resources that are made available,” said Wilma Wooten, M.D., M.P.H., County Public Health Officer.
“It does not change anything that we are currently doing at the local level.”
HHSA continues to work closely with the Imperial County Public Health Department, the California Department of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to determine the cause of the infections and the extent of human-to-human spread. If additional cases are detected, HHSA will promptly report them to the public.
“We continue to have heightened surveillance and this will most likely increase our number of confirmed cases of human infection with swine influenza,” said Wooten. “Our advice to the public continues to be urging them to follow typical precautions they would follow during a regular flu season. Those include if you are sick, do not go to work, school or travel. Cover your mouth when coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose, and wash your hands frequently.”
To date, four cases of swine flu have been reported in San Diego County. They are:
• A 10-year-old male (4/21/09)
• A 54-year-old male and his 16-year-old daughter (4/23/09)
• A 7-year-old male (4/24/09)
• All four San Diego cases have recovered.
• For additional information on swine influenza visit www.cdc.gov or
http://www.sdcounty.ca.gov/Portal/News/swine_flu_cdc_sd.html or call the County of San Diego Swine Influenza Information Line at (858) 715-2250.

county sealNo New Swine Flu Cases Reported in San Diego County

By COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

April 25, 2009 -The County of San Diego Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) has no new cases of swine influenza to report today. Also, there are no pending suspected cases in San Diego County at this time.
HHSA is working closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the California Department of Public Health to determine the cause of the infections and the extent of human-to-human spread. If additional cases are detected, HHSA will promptly report them to the public.
“We have heightened our surveillance and put area healthcare providers on alert. This will most likely generate additional cases of human infection with swine influenza,” said Wilma Wooten, M.D., M.P.H., County Public Health Officer.
To date, four cases of swine flu have been reported in San Diego County. They are:
· A 10-year-old male (4/21/09)
· A 54-year-old male and his 16-year-old daughter (4/23/09)
· A 7-year-old male (4/24/09)
All four San Diego cases have recovered. Nationwide, the total number of cases of human infection stands at eight.
The public is being advised to follow typical precautions as they should during a regular flu season.
“If you are sick, do not go to work, school or travel. Cover your mouth when coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose, and wash your hands frequently,” Wooten concluded.
For additional information on swine influenza visit www.cdc.gov or
http://www.sdcounty.ca.gov/Portal/News/swine_flu_cdc_sd.html or call the County of San Diego Swine Influenza Information Line at (858) 715-2250.

county sealOne New Case of Swine Flu
Total Cases Now Stand at Four in San Diego County; Eight Nationwide

By COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

April 24, 2009- The San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) reports that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed an additional case of human infection with swine influenza A (H1N1) in a San Diego County resident. The new case is a 7-year-old boy.
That brings to four the number of San Diego residents with swine flu. The previous cases are a 10-year-old male and a 54-year-old male and his 16-year-old daughter. All four San Diego cases have recovered. Nationwide, the total number of cases of human infection stands at eight.
“It is anticipated that we will see additional cases of human infection with swine influenza because we have heightened our surveillance and put area healthcare providers on alert,” said Wilma Wooten, M.D., M.P.H., San Diego County Public Health Officer. “We continue to work closely with the CDC, the California Department of Public Health and the Imperial County Public Health Department to investigate the source of these cases.”
While sporadic cases of swine flu have previously been seen in humans in the U.S., this strain of the swine flu has not been previously detected. The symptoms in these cases have been mild and are similar to regular influenza. Swine flu is a cause of respiratory disease in pigs. Most commonly, human cases of swine influenza happen when people are in close proximity to infected pigs, such as in pig production barns and livestock exhibits at fairs. Typically, the symptoms of swine influenza in people are similar to the symptoms of regular seasonal influenza infection and include fever, lethargy, coughing and lack of appetite.
“While there is concern about this new virus, I would like to stress that this is not a pandemic situation,” said Wooten. “There is always a possibility that any new virus could lead to a pandemic, but at this time the World Health Organization has not determined that we have a pandemic.”
San Diego County residents can call the County of San Diego Swine Influenza Information Line at (858) 715-2250.

Swine Flu Outbreaks in Mexico and the United States

SD HEALTH INFO> SWINE FLU UPDATE

April 24, 2009- Health officials are investigating a never-before-seen form of influenza that combines pig, bird and human viruses, and which has killed up to 60 people in Mexico, and also has appeared in the United States, where eight people were infected.
On Friday, April 24, 2009, Mexico shut down schools, museums, libraries and state-run theaters across its crowded capital in hopes of containing a swine flu outbreak that authorities say has killed at least 20 people ­ and perhaps dozens more.
Closing schools across Mexico's capital of 20 million kept 6.1 million students home, as well as thousands of university students. All state and city-run cultural activities were suspended, including libraries, state-run theaters, and at least 14 museums. Private athletic clubs closed down and soccer leagues were considering canceling weekend games.
The closures were the first citywide shutdown of public gathering places since millions died in the devastating 1985 earthquake.
Authorities in Mexico urged people to avoid hospitals unless they had a medical emergency, since hospitals are centers of infection. Mexicans were also encouraged to refrain from customary greetings such as shaking hands or kissing cheeks. At Mexico City's international airport, passengers boarding airplanes were questioned in an effort to prevent travelers with flu symptoms from boarding airplanes and spreading the disease.
Health officials have confirmed that the first death from swine flu occurred on April 13, when a 39-year-old woman died in the state of Oaxaca, south of Mexico City. Newspapers in Mexico have identified her as Adela María Gutiérrez Cruz, a government employee. But Córdova said an earlier case emerged when a 4-year-old boy tested positive for swine flu in an area dotted with pig-breeding farms near Perote in Veracruz state.
Mexico's Health Secretary Jose Angel Cordoba said 68 people have died of flu and the new swine flu strain had been confirmed in 20 of those deaths. At least 1,004 people nationwide were sick from the suspected flu, he said.
President Felipe Calderon met with his cabinet to coordinate Mexico’s response. The government planned to administer its remaining 500,000 vaccines from the flu season to the highest risk group, health workers, although it is not known how effective vaccines are against swine flu. Authorities said they had enough antiviral medicine to treat about 1,000 suspected cases reported so far. It said it also has enough oseltamivir, the generic name for Tamiflu, to treat 1 million people, but the medicine will be strictly controlled and handed out only by doctors.
The city was handing out free surgical masks to passengers on buses and the subway system, which carries five million people each day. Government workers were ordered to wear the masks, and authorities urged residents to stay home from work if they felt ill.
The World Health Organization said tests showed the virus from 12 of the Mexican patients was the same genetically as a new strain of swine flu, designated H1N1, seen in eight people in California and Texas.
Because of intensive searching, it’s likely health officials will find additional cases, said Rear Admiral Anne Schuchat, MD, director of the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases.
The first two cases in the United States were reported in San Diego. ­ a ten-year-old boy in San Diego County and a nine-year-old girl in neighboring Imperial County. Two other cases are near San Antonio, Texas.
In California, Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger said authorities were monitoring patients with flu-like symptoms and communicating with Mexican health officials.
The CDC is checking people who have been in contact with the seven confirmed cases, who all became ill between late March and mid-April.
CDC officials detected a virus with a unique combination of gene segments that have not been seen in people or pigs before. The bug contains human virus, avian virus from North America and pig viruses from North America, Europe and Asia.
On Friday, April 24, 2009, the San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) reports that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed an additional case of human infection with swine influenza A (H1N1) in a San Diego County resident. The new case is a seven-year-old boy.
That brings to four the number of San Diego residents with swine flu. The previous cases are a ten-year-old male and a 54-year-old male and his 16-year-old daughter. All four San Diego cases have recovered. Nationwide, the total number of cases of human infection stands at eight.
“It is anticipated that we will see additional cases of human infection with swine influenza because we have heightened our surveillance and put area healthcare providers on alert,” said Wilma Wooten, M.D., M.P.H., San Diego County Public Health Officer. “We continue to work closely with the CDC, the California Department of Public Health and the Imperial County Public Health Department to investigate the source of these cases.”
While sporadic cases of swine flu have previously been seen in humans in the U.S., this strain of the swine flu has not been previously detected. The symptoms in these cases have been mild and are similar to regular influenza. Swine flu is a cause of respiratory disease in pigs. Most commonly, human cases of swine influenza happen when people are in close proximity to infected pigs, such as in pig production barns and livestock exhibits at fairs. Typically, the symptoms of swine influenza in people are similar to the symptoms of regular seasonal influenza infection and include fever, lethargy, coughing and lack of appetite.
“While there is concern about this new virus, I would like to stress that this is not a pandemic situation,” said Wooten. “There is always a possibility that any new virus could lead to a pandemic, but at this time the World Health Organization has not determined that we have a pandemic.”
San Diego County residents may call the County of San Diego Swine Influenza Information Line at (858) 715-2250.

county sealTwo Additional Cases of Swine Flu
Agency is working with State, Federal Government to Investigate

By COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

April 23, 2009-The San Diego County Health and Human Services Agency (HHSA) reports today that an additional two cases of human infection with swine influenza A (H1N1) have been detected in San Diego County residents. The two new cases are family members. Additionally, an Imperial County resident was diagnosed with the same flu strain at a San Diego facility.
That brings to three the number of San Diego residents with swine flu. The other new case in Imperial County brings their total to two cases. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) also reports two cases in San Antonio, Texas.
“We are working closely with the CDC, the California Department of Public Health and the Imperial County Public Health Department to investigate and track these cases,” said Wilma Wooten, M.D., M.P.H., San Diego County Public Health Officer. “While sporadic cases of swine flu have previously been seen in humans in the U.S., this strain of the swine flu has not been previously detected. The symptoms in these cases have been mild and are similar to regular influenza.”
Swine flu is a cause of respiratory disease in pigs throughout the world and occasionally causes human disease. Most commonly, human cases of swine influenza happen when people are in close proximity to infected pigs, such as in pig production barns and livestock exhibits at fairs. The symptoms of swine influenza in people are similar to the symptoms of regular seasonal influenza infection and include fever, lethargy, coughing and lack of appetite.
“It’s anticipated that we will see more cases because we have heightened our surveillance,” added Wooten.

county sealSwine Flu Outbreak in San Diego

By COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

APRIL 21-SAN DIEGO- Two cases of human infection with swine influenza A (H1N1) have been detected in Imperial and San Diego Counties, according to the Imperial County Public Health Department and San Diego County Health & Human Services Agency.Neither of the patients were hospitalized and both have recovered.
.....The confirmation for the San Diego case was received from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on April 15th and Imperial County received confirmation on April 17th.Both the Imperial County Public Health Department and San Diego County Health & Human Services Agency are working closely with state and federal officials on the investigation.
.....Although swine influenza viruses normally infect and cause illness in pigs, sporadic human infections with swine flu do occasionally occur.The first human swine influenza virus, H1N1, was reported in the United States in 1930. Swine flu is a cause of respiratory disease in pigs throughout the world and can occasionally cause human disease.The seasonal influenza vaccine (i.e., flu shot) does not protect against swine H1N1 viruses.
.....The symptoms of swine influenza in people are similar to the symptoms of regular seasonal influenza infection and include fever, lethargy, coughing and lack of appetite.
To diagnose swine influenza A infection, a respiratory specimen is collected within the first 4 to 5 days of infection.
....Although the current influenza season has been mild in both counties, individuals are encouraged to take the following steps to stop the spread of influenza and other respiratory illnesses:
• Stay home when you are sick to avoid spreading illness to friends and co-workers or students.
• Cough or sneeze into your elbow or a tissue and properly dispose of used tissues.
• Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer to get rid of most germs and avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
• Stay healthy by eating a balanced diet, drinking plenty of water and getting adequate rest and exercise.

Swine Flu detected in two California Children

BY CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH (CDPH)

SACRAMENTO April 21, 09 – Dr. Mark Horton, director of the California Department of Public Health (CDPH), announced today that two cases of swine flu have been reported in California involving a nine-year-old Imperial County girl and a 10-year-old San Diego County boy. Both children became ill with a unique strain of swine flu that has never been identified in the United States. Neither of the patients was hospitalized and both have fully recovered.
The announcement today follows a report issued today by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) encouraging health care providers to be aware of the possibility of swine flu among individuals in the two counties as well as other individuals presenting with the flu who may have been near pigs, including attending fairs or other places where pigs may be displayed.
“Although both of these children have fully recovered, we are investigating the illnesses and working to identify any additional cases,” Horton said. “The California Department of Public Health will continue to work closely with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and local health departments to gather as much information as we can about these swine flu cases.”
Preliminary analyses indicate that the viruses from the two patients are swine influenza A (H1N1) viruses. These viruses are different from the swine flu virus that caused an outbreak of illnesses in 1976.
CDC, the local health departments and CDPH are investigating the sources of exposure. Individuals who have been in contact with the children are being interviewed and tested. Hospitals and providers in the two counties will be given information about the swine flu virus.
CDC receives reports of approximately one human infection with swine influenza virus every one to two years in the United States. However, since 2005, 12 cases of human infection with swine influenza have been reported. The increase could be a result of improved influenza testing in public health laboratories.
Swine flu infections in humans are rare, but are related to close proximity to infected pigs, such as in pig production barns and livestock exhibits at fairs. In the Imperial and San Diego cases, neither patient reported having contact with pigs.
The symptoms of swine flu in humans are similar to the symptoms of seasonal flu and include fever, lethargy, lack of appetite and coughing.
The CDC is investigating the degree to which the seasonal flu vaccine protects against the swine flu viruses. Although the current influenza season has been mild this year, individuals are encouraged to take the following steps to stop the spread of influenza and other respiratory illnesses:
• Stay home when you are sick to avoid spreading illness to co-workers and friends.
• Cough or sneeze into your elbow or a tissue and properly dispose of used tissues.
• Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and warm water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer to get rid of most germs and avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
• Stay healthy by eating a balanced diet, drinking plenty of water and getting adequate rest and exercise.

   
   
 

 

TEL- 619-427-4111 Email - Health@infooption.com

Salud+HealthInfo is for information and educational purposes only. You should not rely on this information as a substitute for personal medical attention, diagnosis or hands-on treatment. If you are concerned abut your health or that of a child, please consult your family's physician or health provider immediately and do not try to diagnose yourself.

Copyright 2001-2009 Info Option Network

About Us | Privacy Policy | Disclaimer | Contact Us